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HARPHAM BUILDING
808 P Street 68508

A bit more detail

The Harpham building was built in 1903 and housed 82 employees of The Harpham Brothers Company. The four-story building was specially designed as both a wholesale warehouse and a thoroughly equipped harness and saddle factory. By 1905 there were three Lincoln saddlery factories, two of which were located in Haymarket.

Attached to the main building at the east rear is the Harpham Brothers Horse Collar Factory, added in 1912. Harpham Brothers remained active until the mid-1950s, manufacturing harnesses, briefcases, golf bags, belts and saddles.

Today, The Harpham Building is the centerpiece of “Haymarket Square”, a mixed-use rehabilitation project consisting of four buildings surrounding a beautiful courtyard with large shad trees, beautiful plants and flowers and water fountain. The brown-brick “P” Street facade of the Harpham Building is one of the most dignified in the district, with three-story tall pilasters framing the upper floors, restrained copper cornice, and a nicely detailed main entrance. That doorway echoes in miniature the design of the whole facade. Note also the wrought iron decoration of the fire escape.

Inside the Harpham Building you will find a variety of unique office spaces available to call your own. Enjoy the sites and sounds of the beautiful courtyard outside your window or enjoy a wonderful meal at Vincenzo’s Ristorante, located on 1st floor of the building.

Available Space

  • Suite 317
    350 sq. ft.
VEITH BUILDING
816 P Street

A bit more detail

The Veith Building ranks as Lincoln’s best example of the small shops common throughout downtown in the 1880s and 1890s, and as such, it is individually listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The building displays an abundance of architectural metalwork, including the cast iron storefront and second floor window lintels, pressed metal cornice, and wrought cresting. The survival of the metal cornice and cresting is especially rare. Note the nameplate on the base of the storefront columns of Seaton & Lea, Lincoln’s own iron workers.

Louis Veith opened his grocery store in this building in 1884 after working as a clerk in his brother Henry’s larger grocery and hardware store. Louis was out of business by 1890. His building has had a variety of occupants since that time.

Be sure to visit the Haymarket Square courtyard before leaving the vicinity.

Available Space

  • NO VACANCY
HORSE COLLAR
818 P Street 68508

A bit more detail

At the north end of the Haymarket Square Courtyard is the Horse Collar Factory. In 1912, the Harpham Brothers attached this red brick building to the Harpham Brothers Saddle and Harness Factory for the purpose of manufacturing “horse collars”.

The two-story building contains a lower level with a high ceiling. Throughout the interior of the Horse Collar Factory one will observe wood beams, columns and joists.

With the completion of “modern” Haymarket Square" the lower level entrance was added directly to the Haymarket Square Courtyard. The second floor office suite enters directly into the Harpham Building second floor.

The Haymarket Square Courtyard adds a beautiful doorstep to the Horse Collar Factory, including trees, a fountain, and plentiful wrought iron and aluminum tables and chairs. The lamp posts are fluted steel columns that originally lined Lincoln’s exclusive Sheridan Boulevard.

Available Space

  • Suite 200F
    144 sq. ft.
MAGNUM BUILDING
824 P Street 68508

A bit more detail

This one-story brick building comprises the eastern border to Haymarket Square Courtyard. Built in 1915 as a factory for the Economy Clothing Company, the structure has had a succession of uses including a floor-covering manufacturer and a chemical wholesaler (Magnum Company).

The interior has one of Haymarket’s best examples of pressed tin ceilings. The original maple wood floors have been preserved in one of the shops. The P Street storefront is enlivened by the simple patterns in the brickwork above the display windows.

During its 1980s restoration, the Magnum Building’s west exterior wall was opened to the Courtyard, thereby accommodating three separate shops and businesses.

Available Space

  • NO VACANCY
APOTHECARY
140 N. 8th Street 68508

A bit more detail

In 1905, architect Ferdinand Fiske, constructed a beautiful four story building. Fiske used wide, windowless corners and three-story tall piers to lend a blocky massiveness to the design, while alternating wide and narrow piers between the window bays to give some variety to the street facades. In 1919, Fiske added a fifth story to the building. The fact that the same architect was involved in both phases probably accounts for the gracefulness of the addition. Originally labeled the Lincoln Drug Company Building, this sturdy warehouse sold drugs, chemicals and pharmaceutical supplies until the 1950’s.

Today, The Apothecary, located at the intersection of 8th & “P” Streets, is in the Heart of Lincoln’s Historic Haymarket District. The Apothecary is home to the Apothecary Lofts, specialty shops, as well as office, business, and professional suites.

Available Space

  • Suite 430
    1500 sq. ft.
RIDNOUR PLAZA
809 P Street 68508

A bit more detail

The Ridnour Building of 1925 was one of the last factory-warehouses built during Haymarket’s principle period of development, replacing another of the district’s several hotels. The original cost of the reinforced concrete structure was about $80,000. Its architects, Meginnis and Schaumberg, previously had been partners of F.C. Fiske. The followed the common pattern of an ornamented front and factory-plain sides. Their choice of decoration is far less common, especially in the relief-carved panels between the stories at either end of the north facade and the similarly carved capitals topping the piers, which seem almost Mayan in inspiration. This building can be considered a precursor to the architects’ later Art Deco designs.

J.C. Ridnour Company was a wholesaler of furnishing goods and notions and a manufacturer of work clothes and overalls. The company formerly had been headquartered a block west and even after building this structure , operated a factory in the Burr and Muir Block.

Today, the Ridnour Building houses numerous State of Nebraska businesses. Located on the 1st floor is also a 7,000 square foot reception venue, called the Ridnour Room, which has been utilized for numerous wedding receptions, social events, meetings and fund-raisers.

Available Space

  • NO VACANCY
ARMOUR BUILDING
100 N. 8th Street 68508

A bit more detail

This small two-story building, located at the northeast corner of 8th and “O” street was building in 1911 for Armour & Co., the meat packers. A close examination reveals surprisingly fine materials, such as the tooled limestone trim and openwork steel trusses supporting the canopy. R.C. Clark of Chicago was the architect and Gerstenberger & Gooden the contractors for the $24,000 building. Earlier structures on the site included a succession of small hotels.

Today, the first floor of the building has been home to two long time tenants, Michael Forsberg Gallery and Jacks Bar & Grill.

Available Space

  • NO VACANCY